Critic’s Corner: Kenneth Miller

Ken Miller is a cell biologist at Brown University. Miller is probably the most well known critic of ID, in part, due to his books Finding Darwin’s God and Only a Theory, his participation in the Dover trial, and his skill as an entertaining and charismatic science communicator.

Miller has vigourously sparred with many key ID proponents in print and in person for over a decade. Most of his response to ID has been directed at Michael Behe and his claims about the irreducible complexity of the bacterial flagellum, the blood clotting cascade, and the limits of neo-Darwinian mechanisms.

Miller’s criticisms of ID seem very strong on the surface, and are often cited as knockdown arguments. However, a closer examination of his critiques reveals a lack of substance and some deep misunderstandings.

Here are Miller’s published and recorded responses to ID, followed by responses to his work from ID theorists and others:
Finding Darwin’s God: A Scientist’s Search for Common Ground Between God and Evolution

Only a Theory: Evolution and the Battle for America’s Soul

Articles/Papers on ID 

YouTube Playlist: Ken Miller’s Lectures and Debates

Reasonable Doubts Podcast Episode: Darwin Day With Ed Brayton and Ken Miller

Testimony transcript from the Dover trial: Part 1/Part 2/Part 3/Part 4

Responses

 

A List of Selected Responses to Kenneth R. Miller

Responses to Ken Miller at Uncommon Descent

Responses to Ken Miller at Evolution News and Views

Responses from Cornelius Hunter

Responses from Answers in Genesis, Institute for Creation Researchand Creation Ministries International

Bradley Monton’s Responses to Ken Miller

Denyse O’Leary’s Responses

Michael Behe’s Responses

Kenneth Miller Resists Chloroquine Resitance

How Did We Get Here? (A written debate between Kenneth R. Miller and Philip E. Johnson)

Banana-Eating Moth Evolved in Less Than 1000 Years?

A Date With Ken Miller

Kenneth Miller’s Best Arguments Against Intelligent Design (accompanying lecture by Sean D. Pitman)

Truth or Dare with Dr. Ken Miller: A Lecture Guide to the Anti-Intelligent Design Claims by Dr. Kenneth Miller 

Mutilating Miller

Miller’s Meanderings: Only the Same Bogus Contentions

Dr. Kenneth Miller: Ignoring the Facts?

In addition to the above material, you can also find various points of response in most works of ID proponents.

Quote of the Month: William Dembski on the Process of Design

Each month I’ll be selecting a quote that’s relevant to the ID debate. The quote I pick could be supportive or critical of ID. Accompanying each quote will be a few of my own thoughts, but ultimately I’d like it to be a chance to focus on it and get some thoughts from readers.

This week’s quote is taken from William Dembski’s 2002 book, No Free Lunch: Why Specified Complexity Cannot Be Purchased Without Intelligence. Here Dembski attempts to give us a general account of the design process, beginning from the designer’s initial end goal and ending with the designed object:

How a designer gets from thought to thing is, at least in broad strokes, straightforward: (1) A designer conceives a purpose. (2) To accomplish that purpose, the designer forms a plan. (3) To execute the plan , the designer specifies building materials and assembly instructions. (4) Finally, the designer or some surrogate applies the assembly instructions to the building materials. What emerges is a designed object,…

(William Dembski, No Free Lunch: Why Specified Complexity Cannot Be Purchased Without Intelligence (Langham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002), p.xi.)

Dembski notes that this process is uncontroversial in cases of human design at least, and that one of ID’s main objectives is to provide a criteria that we can use to infer design in cases where we lack knowledge of this design process, affectively using effect to cause reasoning.

What do readers think?

Are there additional steps that could be added to this?

And is this a good approximation of the process of design?

Does our knowledge of human design processes permit us to infer it in cases where we know that the designer wasn’t human?